Wednesday, March 16, 2022

Sanctuary, Kip Tiernan & Rosie's Place: The Nation's First Shelter for Women; Christine McDonnell (Victoria Tentler-Krylov-Illustrator)

 


Christine McDonnell and (Victoria Tentler-Krylov, Illustrator)
Candlewick Press - 2022 - (ages 7 - 10)

Kip Tiernan grew up during the Great Depression learning early on from her grandmother that it was important to help people who had nothing.  Kip's grandmother, who had 10 children of her own, would make large vats of soup so that when hungry people would knock on her door asking for help because they were out of work, they could count on a bowl of soup to help sustain them.

In 1968 Kip would also feed the hungry at a shelter called Warwick House located in a poor Boston neighborhood. Kip noticed women dressed as men stopping for some food.  At that time it was believed that only men were homeless.  She began noticing women sleeping on park benches and scavenging for food.  Kip spent several days at St Josephs's House in New York City talking to people about their situation.  

Kip, like some of the women she met, overcame alcohol addiction in her 20s. She was determined to help other women. She wanted to open the first shelter for women in Boston where women could come for food and shelter. Her job getting this dream off the ground wasn't easy and, she met obstacles getting others to buy into the idea but on Easter Sunday in 1974 her dream came true - Rosie's Place opened as the first women's shelter in the US.

Sanctuary, is a wonderful book, beautifully illustrated as well,  about the importance of people helping people who are less fortunate.  The author was a former educator at Rosie's House.  The story is tastefully done and informative for middle grade children (younger in some cases) and adults as well.  Highly recommended for both school and public libraries as well as personal collections.



Thanks go to Candlewick Press for sending this lovely book my way in exchange for my unbiased review.

18 comments:

  1. Sounds good, the illustrations look terrific!

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  2. We dont have shelters here in my country as we are overwhelmed by so many problems. Private organisations have started shelters for abused women but the need is far greater than what is
    offered.
    This sounds a great and a comforting read.

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    1. I'm sorry to read that there is a shortage of places to seek help for people who are in need. I really thought this book was well done and, honestly, I never knew about Kip and her determination to help women in need.

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  3. I had never heard of Kip Tieman. What an inspiring story she had.

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    1. Neither had I and I grew up in MA so I am very embarrassed.

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  4. Sounds like a good book for everyone. I'm a big believer in helping those who are less fortunate (animals and people) and those in need of anything they can't get on their own.

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    1. It was very good Vicki. It's easy for me to feel for those who might have to go without, so i am also trying to help others - people and animal organizations as well.

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  5. I love those illustrations!

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    1. The illustrations definitely helped make the story all the more special.

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  6. What an amazing woman! This sounds wonderful.

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    1. A great example of what people fighting for something they believe in can achieve.

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  7. We have an excellent shelter (Providence House) to which I have donated for years. The purpose shelters like this serve can alter lives for generations.

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    1. This is true. We try and support a shelter for battered women.

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  8. What a wonderful message, and the art work is beautiful!

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    1. It's a really important story and like getting a story like this across to younger children as well.

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  9. The illustrations look wonderful and especially like they honor the unhoused.

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    1. I loved the illustrations and felt bad that I didn't know about this woman having grown up in MA.

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