Thursday, January 7, 2016

Coming Soon to a Book Store Near You

I couldn't decide which of several new releases from Knopf-Doubleday to blog about so I picked (3) that I'm looking forward to - all January releases. Doubleday seems to be on a roll with some great sounding books. I just finished The Guest Room, Bohjalian (also released by them this week). Are any of these on you TBR list?


About the Book:

A scathing and exhilarating thriller that begins with a husband's obsession with the seemingly vacant house next door.

It's wintertime in the Hamptons, where Scott and his wife, Elise, have come to be with her terminally ill father, Victor, to await the inevitable. As weeks turn to months, their daily routine—Elise at the hospital with her father, Scott pretending to work and drinking Victor's booze—only highlights their growing resentment and dissatisfaction with the usual litany of unhappy marriages: work, love, passion, each other. But then Scott notices something simple, even innocuous. Every night at precisely eleven, the lights in the neighbor's bedroom turn off. It's clearly a timer . . .but in the dead of winter with no one else around, there's something about that light he can't let go of. So one day while Elise is at the hospital, he breaks in. And he feels a jolt of excitement he hasn't felt in a long time. Soon, it's not hard to enlist his wife as a partner in crime and see if they can't restart the passion.
 
 Their one simple transgression quickly sends husband and wife down a deliriously wicked spiral of bad decisions, infidelities, escalating violence, and absolutely shocking revelations. 

Matt Marinovich makes a strong statement with this novel. The Winter Girl is the 
psychological thriller done to absolute perfection.


About the Book:

A sharp, funny, delightfully unhinged collection of stories set in the dark world of domesticity, American Housewife features murderous ladies who lunch, celebrity treasure hunters, and the best bra fitter south of the Mason Dixon line.

Meet the women of American Housewife:they wear lipstick, pearls, and sunscreen, even when it's cloudy. They casserole. They pinwheel. They pump the salad spinner like it's a CPR dummy. And then they kill a party crasher, carefully stepping around the body to pull cookies out of the oven. These twelve irresistible stories take us from a haunted prewar Manhattan apartment building to the set of a rigged reality television show, from the unique initiation ritual of a book club to the getaway car of a pageant princess on the lam, from the gallery opening of a tinfoil artist to the fitting room of a legendary lingerie shop. Vicious, fresh, and nutty as a poisoned Goo Goo Cluster, American Housewife is an uproarious, pointed commentary on womanhood.

About the Book:

A loving and hilarious—if occasionally spiky—valentine to Bill Bryson’s adopted country, Great Britain. Prepare for total joy and multiple episodes of unseemly laughter.


Twenty years ago, Bill Bryson went on a trip around Britain to discover and celebrate that green and pleasant land. The result was Notes from a Small Island, a true classic and one of the bestselling travel books ever written. Now he has traveled about Britain again, by bus and train and rental car and on foot, to see what has changed—and what hasn’t.

Following (but not too closely) a route he dubs the Bryson Line, from Bognor Regis in the south to Cape Wrath in the north, by way of places few travelers ever get to at all, Bryson rediscovers the wondrously beautiful, magnificently eccentric, endearingly singular country that he both celebrates and, when called for, twits. With his matchless instinct for the funniest and quirkiest and his unerring eye for the idiotic, the bewildering, the appealing, and the ridiculous, he offers acute and perceptive insights into all that is best and worst about Britain today.

Nothing is more entertaining than Bill Bryson on the road—and on a tear. The Road to Little Dribbling reaffirms his stature as a master of the travel narrative—and a really, really funny guy.

16 comments:

  1. I think the Bryson book looks good.

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  2. Definitely have to try the Bill Bryson one. Did you see the movie?

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  3. The American Housewife especially catches my eye! I will look forward to all of your reviews.

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  4. Knopf/Doubleday is big in my January reading! I'm over halfway through American Housewife now. It's proving to be a bit hit and miss for me...well, maybe hit and "meh" is a better description.

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  5. Each of your choices sound appealing in their own way! Thanks for the intro to these upcoming releases!

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  6. I've seen The Winter Girl and put it on my TBR list. I love the cover of American Housewives.

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  7. I didn't really like the last Bryson book I read, but this one looks good. Of all three, American Housewife sounds the best.

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  8. I've been thinking about The Winter Girl. It looks good. And that cover on American Housewife - I love it!

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  9. They both sound good in completely different ways!

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  10. The American Housewife caught my attention too! Looking forward to seeing your review :)

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  11. This look to be really good books.

    In particular The Winter Girl looks intriguing.

    I look forward to reading your commentary on it.

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  12. I love pretty much everything I've read from Knoff Doubleday and have all three of these on my TBR list. I'm not sure when I'll actually get to read them, but The Winter Girl has probably been on my list longer than the others, so I hope to get to it, first.

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  13. American Housewife sounds like fun to read, and my husband and I read everything Bill Bryson writes.

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  14. Ooo, I'm looking forward to The Winter Girl!

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  15. I heard about The Winter Girl somewhere else too and that one sounds great. Just like the type of psychological thriller I enjoy.

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